Prague, Czernin Palace
27 - 29 MAY 2019

Prague European Summit 2019

News List

Preliminary Programme

17:00

Words of Welcome / Tomáš Petříček, Vladimír Bartovic, Ondřej Ditrych

Tomáš Petříček, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic
Vladimír Bartovic, Director, EUROPEUM Institute for European Policy
Ondřej Ditrych, Director, Institute of International Relations

Profiles: Tomáš Petříček, Vladimír Bartovic, Ondřej Ditrych
17:15

Opening panel discussion: 1989 – 2004 – 2019: Different Faces of Europe / Tomáš Petříček, Ana Palacio, Pawel Swieboda, Reka Szemerkényi, Petr Drulák

Some argue that the European Union is more united than ever, following the Brexit negotiations and recent EU crises. Others claim, however, that the internal differences are growing and that the motto of the next phase of European integration will be differentiation. Yet an even bigger perspective is needed: following the euphoria of 1989 and the subsequent rounds of Eastern enlargement, has the European Union of 2019 finally overcome the East-West divide? Are new cleavages emerging or are the old differences revived in the EU? This panel discussion will focus on the long-term evolution of the European Union (and Europe at large) and analyse the face the European Union will wear in the coming years.

Speakers:
Tomáš Petříček, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Czech republic
Ana Palacio, Former Spanish Minister of Foreign Affairs (TBC)
Reka Szemerkenyi, Executive Vice President, Center for European Policy Analysis
Pawel Swieboda, Deputy Head, European Political Strategy Centre
Moderator: Petr Drulák, Ambassador, Embassy of the Czech Republic in Paris

Profiles: Tomáš Petříček, Ana Palacio, Pawel Swieboda, Reka Szemerkényi, Petr Drulák
18:30

Reception & Annual “Vision for Europe” Award

Venue: Czernin Palace, Loretánské náměstí 5, Prague 1

Vision for Europe is the annually bestowed award for distinguished personalities who have, in the course of their lives, devoted substantial energies to the establishment and development of European ideals such as strengthening peaceful co-operation among European nations, developing a fair institutional arrangement of European integration, making European integration more accessible to European publics, and overcoming prejudices and misconceptions related to the integration process.

Profiles:
20:00

Night Owl Session: The “Year of Change” / Christian Lequesne, Barbara Lippert, Vessela Tcherneva, Vita Anda Terauda

The year 2019 might be a decisive moment for Europe, and as such also European integration. Many would like to see 2019 as a turning point that will move European integration away from the recent difficult years. For the first time in its history, the EU will lose one of its member states and the two largest parties are expected to lose their majority in the European Parliament. Simultaneously, national populism is on the rise across Europe, threatening the core pillars European integration has relied on. How will the result of the EP election influence the EU? What should the new EC do differently? How should the conclusions of the Bratislava process be implemented?

Speakers:
Anda Vita Tērauda, Chairperson of European Affairs Committee, Saeima of the Republic of Latvia
Barbara Lippert, Director of Research & Executive Board, Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik
Christian Lequesne, Professor, Sciences Po & Chief Editor, European Review of International Studies
Vessela Tcherneva, Deputy Director of the European Council on Foreign Relations and Head of the Sofia office
Chair: TBA

 

Profiles: Christian Lequesne, Barbara Lippert, Vessela Tcherneva, Vita Anda Terauda
08:00

Discussion Breakfast: What leadership vision for the EU? / Péter Balázs, Annika Ben-David

Venue: Embassy of the French Republic, Velkopřevorské náměstí 2, Prague 1

Recent years have seen the rise of populist leaders across Europe, affecting the EU project through the instigation of Brexit, an increase in anti-immigration and nationalistic sentiments and anti-gender movements. These negative tendencies have been propagated especially by politicians emulating the global trend of ’strongman’ leaders and populist politics. Against this background, however, there are leaders with a vision of a unified Europe capable of acting globally. Going further to the national level, Sweden and France, the latter currently as chair of the G7, have promoted a feminist approach to their domestic politics and in tackling international security, migration or environmental challenges. But has the EU got a clear vision for how to lead internally and on the international stage? What lessons in leadership can the EU take from, for instance, the Swedish feminist government? Can Europe take such a path to confront its domestic problems and to become more engaged globally? What would that mean more precisely? Is there a demand for such leadership in the EU and internationally? This discussion breakfast is organized by the Embassy of the French Republic and the Embassy of Sweden.

Speakers:
Péter Balázs, Professor, Central European University, former EU Commissioner & Minister of Foreign Affairs of Hungary
Annika Ben David, Ambassador-at-large for Human Rights, Democracy and the Rule of Law, Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Sweden
Chair: Silvie Lauder, Editor, Respekt

Profiles: Péter Balázs, Annika Ben-David
10:00

Key-Note Address: New Trajectory for Europe / Andrej Babiš

Andrej Babiš, Prime Minister of the Czech Republic

Profiles: Andrej Babiš
10:50

Panel A: European sovereignty and strategic autonomy. How can we make it work? / Annika Ben-David, Aleš Chmelař, Thomas Gomart, Sylvia Hartleif, Lucia Yar

The EU’s Global Strategy claims that an appropriate level of strategic autonomy in the EU is crucial for its ability to promote peace and security. Whilst familiar, the words 'strategic autonomy' regularly stir up confusion, and, sometimes, even alarm. This raises the following question: what is strategic autonomy and what does it imply? Does strategic autonomy mean autonomy as responsibility, autonomy as hedging and/or autonomy as emancipation in the context of the EU? This panel provides a space to consider multiple views on the concept and its implications for the EU’s foreign policy, transatlantic relations and beyond.

Speakers:
Annika Ben David, Ambassador-at-large for Human Rights, Democracy and the Rule of Law,Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Sweden
Aleš Chmelař, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs for European Issues, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic
Thomas Gomart, Director, French Institute of the International Relations (IFRI)
Sylvia Hartleif, Principal Advisor, Leader Foreign Policy Team, European Political Strategy Centre, European Commission
Moderator: Lucia Yar, Senior Editor, EurActiv.sk

Profiles: Annika Ben-David, Aleš Chmelař, Thomas Gomart, Sylvia Hartleif, Lucia Yar
10:50

Panel B: Industrial Revolution 4.0 Effects on European Societies / Jaroslava Rezlerová, Hilary Sutcliffe, Peter Varga, Adela Zábražná, Ivan Hodáč

In the Industrial Revolution 4.0, an economy is no longer based on the interaction between workers and machines but on the interaction between machines and other machines. There will be less of a need for blue- or white-collar workers, while products and services will reach consumers without human intervention. This panel provides a space to consider the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats that the Industrial Revolution 4.0 brings to societies in Europe in the light of its economic and social effects.

Speakers:
Kalle Palling, Chairperson of European Union Affairs Committee, Riigikogu of the Republic of Estonia
Jaroslava Rezlerová, Director General of ManpowerGroup Czech Republic
Hilary Sutcliffe, Director of MATTER, UK
Peter Varga, CEO, Lafluence
Adela Zábražná, Executive Manager, the Slovak Alliance for Innovation Economy
Moderator: Ivan Hodáč, Founder and President, Aspen Institute Central Europe

Profiles: Jaroslava Rezlerová, Hilary Sutcliffe, Peter Varga, Adela Zábražná, Ivan Hodáč
12:20

Plenary Panel: Challenges to the rule of law and the EU’s fundamental values / Péter Balázs, Ivan Krastev, Constanza Sanhueza-Petrarca, Žiga Turk, Eric Maurice

The European Union is not only a community built on shared interests but also on shared values. This common understanding of values and norms embedded in the European integration project are now being put into question. It seems that the rule-based order the EU has functioned upon since its establishment is not as solid as it once appeared. Europeans have to find answers to several crucial questions: How can the EU protect the rule of law and its fundamental values internally? What can the EU institutions do in this respect? What measures should be adopted in order to preserve a rule-based order inside the EU? Is conditionality the right way forward?

Speakers:
Constanza Sanhueza, Research Fellow, WZB Berlin Social Science Center and Research Associate, V-Dem Institute
Ivan Krastev, Chairman, Centre for Liberal Strategies, Sofia; Permanent Fellow, Institute for Human Sciences, Vienna
Péter Balázs, Professor, Central European University, former EU Commissioner & Minister of Foreign Affairs of Hungary
Žiga Turk, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, Martens Center, Brussels
Chair: Eric Maurice, Head of Brussels office, Robert Schuman Foundation

Profiles: Péter Balázs, Ivan Krastev, Constanza Sanhueza-Petrarca, Žiga Turk, Eric Maurice
14:30

Plenary Panel: Data as a New Currency. Big Data Governance and Public Policy / Jaanika Merilo, Jaana Sinipuro, , Declan Curry

Can the Big Data era lead to better and more targeted policy making and more intelligent governance? While Big Data help governments by providing them with accurate policy analysis that is proactive and participatory, it also increases risks related to data privacy and potential misuse. Where is then the line between efficient use of Big Data analysis for improvement of policy decision making and public diplomacy and when it is at the expense of the security of both states and citizens? What are the risks of using artificial intelligence in public governance and how can the governments counter them?

Speakers:
Gabriella Cseh, Head of Public Policy for Central and Eastern Europe for Facebook
Jaanika Merilo, Advisor to Minister of Infrastructure, Advisor to Mayors of Dnipro and Lviv
Jaana Sinipuro, Project Director, The Finnish Innovation Fund Sitra
Petr Václavek, Founder of Foodgroot.com, Chief Strategy Officer at Presidential Campaign ofMarek Hilšer
Chair: Declan Curry, Writer, Journalist & Broadcaster

Profiles: Jaanika Merilo, Jaana Sinipuro, , Declan Curry
16:05

Panel A: The Future of European Neighbourhood / Steven Blockmans, Ilgvars Klava, Věra Řiháčková-Pachta, Adnan Tabatabai, Stefan Tinca

The European Neighbourhood Policy was conceived with the aim of creating a ring of peaceful, stable and prosperous states at the EU’s borders. However, the situation has dramatically changed as many new challenges have emerged in the neighbourhood, ranging from the conflicts in Syria and Ukraine to economic stagnation and democratic backsliding in many other partner countries in the EU’s southern and eastern neighbourhood. Therefore, we need to ask the most fundamental questions about the future of the European neighbourhood: Does the EU need a new impetus for its policy in the neighbourhood? How can we make the policy truly attractive to partner countries? Should the EU kick-start its engagement in the region? What are the potential areas for cooperation in the neighbourhood? How can we deal with the influence of external actors who are sometimes opposed to the EU’s intentions in the region? How are the EU’s and the other main actors’ policies perceived in the neighbourhood? What kind of cooperation is necessary to foster job creation and increase economic growth there?

Speakers:
Steven Blockmans, Head of Europe in the World & Institutions Units, CEPS
Ilgvars Klava, Ambassador, Director General, Bilateral Relations Directorate, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Latvia
Věra Řiháčková Pachta, Senior Associate Research Fellow EUROPEUM/ Advocacy Manager Eastern Partnership Civil Society Forum
Adnan Tabatabai, Chief Executive Officer of CARPO – Center for Applied Research in Partnership
with the Orient
Stefan Tinca, Political Director, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Romania
Chair: Jan Šnaidauf, Head of Advisors to the Minister, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Czech Republic

Profiles: Steven Blockmans, Ilgvars Klava, Věra Řiháčková-Pachta, Adnan Tabatabai, Stefan Tinca
16:05

Panel B: Competitiveness of Europe in the field of Artificial Intelligence and Virtual Reality / Laura Delponte, Gemma Galdon-Clavell, Iliyana Tsanova

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and other digital tools are quickly becoming a key driver of economic development, bringing innovation and smart solutions to almost every aspect of citizens’ daily lives. Rapid developments in the sector, its strategic importance and immense potential forced Europe’s leaders to act in the past year. The joint "Communication Artificial Intelligence for Europe" from April 2018 is a first step towards a coordinated approach in the upcoming years and more money should be available in the last two years of Horizon 2020. Furthermore, the proposal of the new MFF aims to mainstream the support for new digital tools to various chapters. Advantages and opportunities of AI and other emerging technologies go hand in hand with several challenges, mainly in the field of data protection and cybersecurity – especially when major tech companies are currently not based in Europe. How can Europe compete in the field dominated by American and Asian companies? Is extensive financial support for research enough to ensure Europe’s competitiveness? Does the current educational scheme fit the needs of the new digital economy? How should the EU regulate the new field of AI? Can regulation fuel competitiveness or is it threatening it?

Speakers:
Laura Delponte, Development and Evaluation Unit, Centre for Industrial Studies
Gemma Galdon Clavell, Director of Eticas Research & Consulting
Juraj Hošták, Smart Cities CSE Coordinator, InnovEYtion Hub Manager, Ernst & Young
Iliyana Tsanova, Deputy Managing Director, European Fund for Strategic Investments, European Investment Bank
Moderator: TBA

Profiles: Laura Delponte, Gemma Galdon-Clavell, Iliyana Tsanova
17:35

Panel A: Brexit. What now? / Lucinda Creighton, Roland Freudenstein, Adrian Gahan, Marika Linntam, Tony Barber

Since the beginning of the Brexit process in 2016, the EU’s first membership crisis has been characterized by unpredictability, uncertainty, and chaos. Now, almost three years later, it is less certain than ever whether Brexit will finally be resolved with the departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union – or if it will not happen at all. Following the extension of the UK’s official date of exit to October 31st 2019, there is clearly much work ahead for both the EU and UK. What more can the EU do with regards to Brexit? Does the political will exist in the UK to prevent a departure from the Union, within the time available? How can the European Union prevent a similar membership crisis from occurring in the future?

Speakers:
Lucinda Creighton, CEO, Vulcan Consulting
Roland Freudenstein, Deputy Director and Head of Research at Wilfried Martens Centre for European Studies
Adrian Gahan, Political Consultant, UK
Charles Grant, Director, Centre for European Reform
Marika Linntam, Director General, Department of European Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Estonia
Moderator: Tony Barber, Europe Editor, Financial Times

Profiles: Lucinda Creighton, Roland Freudenstein, Adrian Gahan, Marika Linntam, Tony Barber
17:35

Panel B: The Future Path of Euro (in cooperation with the Institute for Policy and Society) / Gabriela Cretu, Oldřich Dědek, Jean-Pierre Landau, Hanni Schoelermann, Jan Macháček

The eurozone can only work if countries are better off inside the currency union than on the outside of it. In its current form, the single currency seems unsustainable in the long term. At the same time, the success and/or failure of the eurozone will determine the EU's future, as continuing low growth and divergent economic fortunes will further spur Euroscepticism. This panel provides a space to consider the following questions: What are the missing pieces of the eurozone architecture? How can we move beyond the current visions of eurozone governance? Has the eurozone governance been sufficiently reformed to deal with a future crisis? What are the criteria on the basis of which the eurozone will evolve? Do Germany and France hold the keys in the related decisions, or are other EU member states equally important in this regard?

Speakers:
Gabriela Cretu, Chairperson, European Affairs Committee, Romanian Senate
Oldřich Dědek, Czech National Bank Board member
Jean-Pierre Landau, Professor, Economics Department, SciencesPo Paris; Senior Research Fellow Harvard Kennedy School
Hanni Schoelermann, Economist, European Central Bank
Moderator: Jan Macháček, Chairman of the Board, Institute for Politics and Society

Profiles: Gabriela Cretu, Oldřich Dědek, Jean-Pierre Landau, Hanni Schoelermann, Jan Macháček
18:45

Networking Reception

Venue: Czernin Palace

Welcome address

Profiles:
08:00

Discussion Breakfast: Coalition Building after Brexit / Lucinda Creighton, Barbara Lippert, Stefan Tinca, Adrian Gahan

Venue: Embassy of Romania, Nerudova 5, Prague 1

The European Union in itself represents the positive history of equal engagement between states, based on shared values, cooperation and responsiveness. As a meandering Brexit has unfolded before Europe's eyes, a new sense of dynamics and patterns of interaction emerge within the EU. With the departure of the UK, EU Member States realize they will have to rely more than before on tailored communities of interests. Will this impact upon our common values? Are alliances convenient, bearing in mind that internal cohesion is more than ever a prerequisite for the EU's stance in this multipolar world? Will they just strengthen the already existing division between national preferences and consensual EU policies or are they a necessary tool of flexibility and differentiation to push forward integration? What role exists for medium-sized states in this shifting reality of like-mindedness? Furthermore, what is the impact on CFSP and CSDP of this changing balance generated by Brexit? In order to become an ever stronger and more visible actor, the EU has to make better use of existing instruments and policies, including the pursuit of a more efficient CFSP. This debate will provide a space to answer these and other related questions such as President Juncker's proposal on CFSP (qualified majority voting), the need for a reinforced EEAS and for more efforts towards informal consensus-building, as well as the subject of the EU's strategic autonomy. This discussion breakfast is organized by the Embassy of Romania.

Speakers:
Lucinda Creighton, former Irish Minister for European Affairs and CEO of Vulcan Consulting
Barbara Lippert, Director of Research & Executive Board, Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik
Stefan Tinca, Political Director, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Romania
Moderator: Adrian Gahan, Political Consultant, UK

Profiles: Lucinda Creighton, Barbara Lippert, Stefan Tinca, Adrian Gahan
08:00

Discussion Breakfast: Atlantic Challenges / Tony Barber, Reka Szemerkényi, Jan Macháček

Venue: Bellevue, Smetanovo nábřěží 18, Prague 1

Tensions in Euro-Atlantic relations – between the European Union and the United States – are deepening. Between the two continents, there is a threat of commercial war. Tariffs on steel and aluminium have been introduced, the US has withdrawn from the Iran nuclear agreement and the danger of duties for European cars is real. Unusually sharp rhetoric has been employed by both European and American representaties. Disputes over the Russian-German Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline are also escalating. The relationship between the United States and the European Union - two key global partners - is now going through a very complicated period. The current functioning of NATO and its future is at the centre of this tension. Trump still insists that NATO members must spend 2% of their GDPs on defence. The European countries are generally unwilling or unable to fulfil this commitment. To what extent are Euro-Atlantic relations damaged? In what areas should we be careful? And what can the Czech Republic do to stabilize this partnership?

This discussion breakfast is organised by the Institute for Policy and Society.

Speakers:
Tony Barber, Europe Editor, Financial Times
Charles Grant, Director, Centre for European Reform
Reka Szemerkenyi, Executive Vice President, Center for European Policy Analysis
Moderator: Jan Macháček, Chairman of the Board, Institute for Politics and Society

Profiles: Tony Barber, Reka Szemerkényi, Jan Macháček
08:00

Discussion Breakfast: Chinese Influence in (Central) Europe

Venue: American Center, Tržiště 366/13, Prague 1

In last years it was evident that Chinese activity in Europe is growing. Chinese president Xi Jinping visited Europe several times in last years and signed various agreements about strategic partnership with governments of Central and Eastern European countries. Group of 16 states from this region (including 10 EU Member States) established a platform for enhancing economic cooperation with China. Whereas in some states we have seen intense flow of Chinese investments, in others it is mainly about political influence. This group of states from Central and Eastern Europe was criticized by EU and Germany for establishing such platform as it can serve as a tool for erosion of EU unity. Nevertheless, China is an important economic partner for Western European countries (France or UK) and Italy even joined Chinese “Belt and Road Initiative” this year. However, we can see the decrease of Chinese investments now and China relations with some of Central European states are negatively affected by raising doubts about safety of Chinese ICT technologies used for critical state infrastructure. Join us for informal discussion about Chinese influence in (Central) Europe and its geopolitical, economic and technological dimension. This topic is also relevant in the context of EU unity and its internal and external relations, but also in the context of world economic order.

Profiles:
10:00

High Level Ministerial Panel: Central Europe as an active player in the aftermath of the European Parliament Election / Florian Herrmann, Miroslav Lajčák, Tomáš Petříček, Oliver Schenk

Over the last several decades, a broad alliance of big parties has called the shots in the EU. Politicians from the mainstream centre-right and centre-left parties have held a comfortable majority in the EU's principal institutions, including the European Parliament (EP), the European Council, and the European Commission. However, this era could come to an end with the next EP elections in May 2019, following the waning support for mainstream parties, the rise of populists on both the radical right and left, and the emergence of new political players. How will Central Europeans fit into this newly established distribution of power? What should the representatives of Central European countries do to assume an active role in the changing EU after the upcoming EP elections? Might the past clashes of their governments influence their position or will the new distribution lead to a smoothing of these clashes?

Speakers:
Florian Herrmann, Head of the State Chancellery and Minister for Federal and European Affairs and Media of Bavaria
Miroslav Lajčák, Minister of Foreign and European Affairs of the Slovak Republic
Tomáš Petříček, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic
Oliver Schenk, Head of the State Chancellery and Minister for Federal and European Affairs of Saxony

 

Profiles: Florian Herrmann, Miroslav Lajčák, Tomáš Petříček, Oliver Schenk
11:15

European Innovation Chat A: Is it the end of global agreements on common challenges? / Vladimir Bartl, Vassilis Ntousas

The deteriorating transatlantic relationship since the election of President Trump has shown that strategic partnerships are harder to maintain nowadays. The economic competition with China, the security concerns posed by Russia’s resurgence, and even increasing political divisions on the European continent make it harder to find new partnerships. The difficulty to complete free trade agreements, such as with Japan and Canada, show that multilateralism is going through a complicated period. Should Europeans wait it out, or is it symbolic of a deeper rift? Who are the new actors in this picture? Can regions, cities, or the private sector provide a new impetus? What are the main issues, such as climate change, that we will need to deal with together in a global fashion?

Speakers:
Vladimir Bärtl, Deputy Minister, Section of European Union and Foreign Trade, Ministry of Industry and Trade, Czech Republic
Moderator: Vassilis Ntousas, Senior International Relations Policy Advisor, Foundation for European Progressive Studies

Profiles: Vladimir Bartl, Vassilis Ntousas
11:15

European Innovation Chat B: Is Europe Ready for a Dynamic Future? Role of EU Governments and Governance. / Nadine Smith

The impending fourth industrial revolution, with a fusion of technologies blurring the lines between the digital, biological and physical spheres, is set to fundamentally challenge our conceptions of society, much like the industrial revolutions preceding it, and thus also the role of governments and governance as the caretakers of our societies. How will the EU and state governments face the challenge of automation coupled with an ever-increasing global population? How will the advent of artificial intelligence and quantum computing affect our democracies, given how vulnerable to electronic influencing elections and referendums have proven to be in recent years? While technological advancement is inexorable, the need for regulation and governance in a dynamic future on both the regional and global levels has become absolute. How can the EU ready itself for a dynamic, accelerating future characterized by technological leaps that affect our societies and lives in a hitherto unprecedented degree?

Speakers:
Nadine Smith, Global Director of Marketing and Communications, Centre for Public Impact
Kalle Palling, Chairperson of European Union Affairs Committee, Riigikogu of the Republic of Estonia

Profiles: Nadine Smith
12:15

Chat: Evolution of Humans in the Next Century. Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies / Karel Janeček

What happens when machines surpass humans in general intelligence? As recent developments seem to indicate, the question truly is not that of if, but when. Thanks to this decade's breakthroughs in artificial intelligence, machines are becoming increasingly better at tasks that have been previously limited to humans, from driving vehicles to interpreting languages. Optimistic researchers hope to build a system capable of human-like general intelligence within the next decade. Others are less hopeful and note that intelligence is not the same as sentience or consciousness. Nevertheless, there exists a growing fear of a superhuman intelligence with its own motivations breaking free of control and endangering humanity itself. Is the fear of such a rogue super-intelligence grounded in reality? What can be done to alleviate some of the worries related to artificial intelligence? How should this technology be harnessed for the common good?

Speakers:
Karel Janeček, Czech mathematician, entrepreneur, anti-corruption campaigner
Peter Szenasy, Managing partner, EPDOR

Profiles: Karel Janeček
13:00

Closing Remarks

Closing remarks followed by a light refreshment.

Profiles:

Speakers List

International Programme Board

The International Programme Board is the key advisory body of the Prague European Summit. It meets on a regular basis, at least once a year. The International Programme Board is comprised of leading international thinkers who care about the future of European integration. The Board is essential in shaping the substantive part of the Prague European Summit, and its tasks include the formulation of programme priorities for the upcoming Summit in May 2019 as well as innovative suggestions regarding the Summit´s structure, its side-events and its output.

Speakers

Multimedia

Teaser 2019

About

About PES
As an initiative of EUROPEUM Institute for European Policy and the Institute of International Relations, and under the patronage of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic, Office of the Government of the Czech Republic, Representation of the European Commission in the Czech Republic and the City of Prague, the Prague European Summit has been established to trigger a strategic and open debate on the future of the European Union among high-level political representatives, government officials, business representatives, academicians and journalists from the Czech Republic, EU countries, V4 countries and other. 

Its goal is to find common answers to the key questions in the economic, social, foreign-political and institutional areas. By hosting this regular summit on the future of European integration in Prague, the organizers contribute to recasting the image of the Czech Republic as an EU member country which self-confidently yet constructively joins the strategic discussions on the course of the EU. 

EUROPEUM Institute for European Policy

Institute of International Relations




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The European Union at a Crossroads – Aftermath of the 2019 European elections and other key issues of the European integration to be discussed at the 5th annual Prague European Summit.

On 27th, 28th and 29th of May European politicians, members of academia, delegates of top European think-tanks and institutes together with business and media representatives will give one of the first reflections on the European elections in Prague.

To see the full press release download the PDF attachment.

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